Home » Costal, the Indian Zapotec, a Tale, by Gabriel Ferry by Louis Ferry G. De Bellemare
Costal, the Indian Zapotec, a Tale, Gabriel Ferry by Louis Ferry G. De Bellemare

Costal, the Indian Zapotec, a Tale,

Gabriel Ferry by Louis Ferry G. De Bellemare

Published May 20th 2012
ISBN : 9781150657962
Paperback
264 pages
Enter the sum

 About the Book 

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1857 Excerpt: ...which henceforth could not be his own?MoreThis historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1857 Excerpt: ...which henceforth could not be his own? The proud silence of the captain would likely ruin his hopes, and render still more impassable the barrier which had been raised between bis duty and his love. The news of the death of Valdes, brought to the hacienda by a passing traveller, with the terror inspired by the inscription which revealed its author, fell on that household like a thunderbolt. Unfortunately, the same traveller could not inform his hosts about that of which he was ignorant himself--the murder of Don Luis Tres Villas, the cause of this bloody retaliation. From that moment the inmates of the hacienda looked upon the captain only as a traitor, who, under an exterior of patriotism, bad concealed an ardent sympathy for the oppressors of the country which had given him birth. Still, the love of Gertrudis had attempted that justification which the pride of Don Rafael had not deigned to make. Oh my father. she would say. amid the keen anguish she was suffering, some day or other a message from Don Rafael will fully explain his conduct, Let him explain it any time he likes, returned Don Mariano, will he be the less a traitor to his country? No he knows that nothing can absolve him, and he will not even dare to make us try to pardon his unworthy behaviour. Such a message, in fact, never came, and Gertrudis was constrained to devour her tears in silence. However, the bold defiance to the insurgents that his hand had inscribed upon the door of the manor-house of Valdes, had too much of the chivalrous in it not to plead the cause of the absent one for some time. This prevailed for a moment, for they learned at last that the head of the chief insurgent only replaced that of the father of Don Rafael--blood ha...