Home » The Travel Addicts Puzzle: Around (most of) Half the World in Forty Days by Philip Gerald Brown
The Travel Addicts Puzzle: Around (most of) Half the World in Forty Days Philip Gerald Brown

The Travel Addicts Puzzle: Around (most of) Half the World in Forty Days

Philip Gerald Brown

Published
ISBN :
Kindle Edition
247 pages
Enter the sum

 About the Book 

The Travel Addict’s Puzzle explores the forces that continue to drive a man, who is no longer young, to wander the world on the smell of an oily rag. The narrative relates the adventures the author had while travelling alone from Eastern China toMoreThe Travel Addict’s Puzzle explores the forces that continue to drive a man, who is no longer young, to wander the world on the smell of an oily rag. The narrative relates the adventures the author had while travelling alone from Eastern China to Bulgaria on public transport and his reflections on other journeys, particularly those to and around China. He follows the old silk road to cross the vast deserted steppe of Kazakhstan, travels through the only Buddhist republic in Europe, where the capital city has been inspired by a work of fiction, skirts around troubled Chechnya to attend a vodka-fuelled wedding proposal in North Ossetia and crosses the Caucasus Mountains to enter beautiful Georgia through the back door, before spanning the breadth of Turkey to Bulgaria and the European Union.The attempt to understand his travel addiction develops as being far more complex and detailed than would first have been thought, with notions such as searching for an imagined Arcadia from childhood, collecting images that become the building blocks of an individual’s identity and creating a kaleidoscope of movement in an effort to resist change, as just some of the conclusions that are drawn from reflecting upon the experience of travelling. The clues to the puzzle are found in the bizarre and often hilarious situations which are the meat and drink of the intrepid traveller and humour, much of it self-deprecating, is used throughout the book which is essentially meant as light reading and designed to entertain. The author is not afraid to give his views on the world and the people in it, but in trying to make sense of it all there is a deepening satisfaction in the realisation that the more that is understood the deeper the mysteries become.